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on social security and medicare benefits. corker joined several republican senators and house members who have suggested they might abandon a longstanding pledge not to raise taxes. but the author of that pledge, conservative lobbyist grover nor quist, played down any hint he's losing influence. he called it, quote, a complete media-created frenzy. on the left, democratic senator dick durbin of illinois urged liberal groups to give way on their opposition to changes in medicare and medicaid. >> we cannot standby on the side lines in denial that this is ever going to engage us in the things that we value. we can't be so naive to believe that just taxing the rich is going to solve our problems. wlook to reform and change that is significant, that preserves many of the values and programs that brought us to political life. >> brown: for his part senate page ontario leader harry reid declared himself extremely hopeful even as the end of the year and the end of the current congress rapidly approach. as this debate has unfolded we've been sample ago variety of voices of on what should be done.
1, 2013, tax breaks worth $416 billion will expire. spending on things like defense, medicare payments to doctors will be slashed by $65 billion. add it all up and you are talking about cutting roughly half a trillion dollars from the federal budget. the congressional budget office and others warn going over the cliff will send the economy into a recession in the first half of next year. it was congress and the white house that set the deadline in hopes of forcing each other to cut the federal budget deficit and begin to address the growing national debt. of the half trillion dollars the fiscal cliff is designed to cut in red ink next year, 80% of it comes in the form of higher taxes. under current law, 20% comes from lowering government spending. this is just the first step as part of a $7 trillion effort to cut the debt over the next decade. that has led some to describe what could be coming as a fiscal slope, not a cliff. whatever geological description you prefer, it is on the map for every american. >> susie: a critical issue in this fiscal cliff debate: jobs. if the gove
's most popular programs. >> medicare is clearly in the gunsights. >> reporter: it's possible congress and the president could agree to save $300 to $400 billion from medicare by cutting fees for doctors and hospitals. but analysts worry slashing payments won't make the health care system more efficient. >> this is not really a way to structurally change medicare and if you don't change the underlying incentives, you don't get long-term savings. >> reporter: progressives at the center for american progress say the government could save close to $150 billion by squeezing the prices the government pays for drugs. but many of the president's allies reject the idea of aggressively raising co-payments for patients. and they also consider benefits based on a patient's financial situation a risky idea. >> if people want to ask the wealthy to pay more, the time to ask them to pay more is when they can afford it, which is to say when they are working, not when they are retired. so they way to do that is to ask them to pay a little bit more in taxes. >> reporter: the president and congressional
to go in rehab? are you set up in medicare and medicaid?" the list went on. and i was just a mom with three little kids and not prepared, not prepared to take on that responsibility. and yet i had to. >> according to a recent study, 36% of all caregivers are adult children taking care of an aging parent. and that's expected to rise dramatically. people 85 and older are the fastest growing group in america, and census projections say their numbers will more than double, to 11.5 million, by the year 2035. >> author jane gross says it's a situation our entire society is unprepared to deal with. her own education began about a decade ago, when she and her brother needed to care for their ailing elderly mother. as a journalist for "the new york times," gross was used to getting information easily. but with this, she says she felt clueless on multiple fronts. >> medical, various entitlement programs like medicare and medicaid and how they work. residential, where was she going to live? legal, financial, those are the most obvious ones but they don't overlap and, you know, you can't mak
among the closest races where you could say this was on social security or it was on medicare, but when you look at our toss-up races we had going into election day, a majority of them were in three key areas. they were in illinois, california, and new england. those are all places ere the president did very well. i think that even though going into election day those were close races, but the undecideds were president obama voters. they also broke for the democratic congressional candidate. >> woodruff: in a way there was maybe coat tail as part of the president's race. >> in states where they weren't swing states the races were places where the president did well. i think democratic candidates benefited. >> woodruff: as you look at the country overall, nathan, is there a trend, is there a story to be told about who did a better job, which party or the other d a better job o targeting these races? >> i think some of it is geographic. you had democrats strengthening and dem trattic states and democratic regions such as new england where there's no longer, there's no house republicans in
is that there is deep disagreement over whether entitlement programs like social security and medicare should be on the table right now or not, and the disagreement is sharpest over social security. darren gersh takes a look at why. >> reporter: the number-two man in the senate democratic leadership argues any fix for social security's finances should come after the immediate challenge is out of the way. >> i think we should take social security off the table for the current fiscal cliff and deficit discussion, but be very honest about what we're going to achieve in the near term. >> reporter: republicans pushed back, arguing social security is part of the deficit problem because it is no longer taking in enough in taxes to cover the benefits it pays out. social security makes up the difference by cashing in special treasury bonds it holds in its trust fund. but conservatives point out the money to redeem those bonds comes from taxpayers. >> it is money that is coming out of general revenue that is going into social security that reduces the amount of revenue that is available for everything
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)

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